About your Search

20130801
20130831
STATION
CSPAN 23
CSPAN2 20
CNNW 16
KGO (ABC) 12
CNBC 8
CNN 8
WMAR (ABC) 5
WRC (NBC) 5
FBC 4
MSNBCW 4
KPIX (CBS) 3
MSNBC 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 140
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 140 (some duplicates have been removed)
big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
electricity to gas to extend your driving range. no wonder volt is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. ♪ the 2013 volt. charge ahead of the rest in the hov lane. ♪ >>> myth number 5, our drinking water is in danger was r because oil companies frack. frack? what's that? >> end fracking now. >> the controversy is over chemicals being injected into the earth to break up rock and release natural gas. >> fracking means shoving water and chemicals into the ground, fracturing the rock to release oil and gas. this has been done for 60 years. but recently, geologists learned how to drill sideways. result? america now has much more and, therefore, cheaper natural gas. this means families pay less to heat their homes. soon, america may be self sufficient in energy. also, if you're worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> fracking feels wrong. it feels like you're pumping stuff into mother earth. but it's an amazing story. >> a liberal european environmentalist points out that europe promised to
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> bob filner has resigned at mayor of san diego. he spent his last two months fighting a growing list have sexual harassment allegations. the san diego city council accepted his resignation this afternoon. he will officially step down august 30. he said goodbye to san diego, and apologized for letting the city down. >> obviously this is not a happy time for any of us, not for the city of san diego, not for those who represent and for my own part in causing all this, i offer deep apology certainly to all the citizens of san diego and through you to the citizens that you represent. the city should not have been put through this, and my own personal failures were responsible, and i apologize to the city. >> stephanie stanton joins us live from san diego. he apologized, but he didn't admit bob filner did r
, and dealing with assistance to those in america, the richest country on the face of the earth, who are going hungry, a large number of whom are children who live in america. the committee on agriculture passed out a bipartisan bill in the last congress and it was never brought before my republican friends. this year the committee also passed out a bipartisan bill that was brought to this floor. it could have and should have been passed with a bipartisan vote. not because i agreed with all of it, but because it was appropriate to have a bill to go to conference with on this important subject. our republican friends added three amendments which we harmful to clearly those in need in america. as a result, we didn't vote for it, but that's not why it failed, mr. speaker. it failed because 62 republicans voted against the bill reported out with every republican voting in committee for it. one was mr. lucas, the chairman of the committee observed, it apparently wasn't good enough for those 62 republicans. compromise seems very difficult for some people in this house. but i again remind us all it
been done for 60 years. but recently, geologists learned how to drill sideways. result? america now has much more and, therefore, cheaper natural gas. this means families pay less to heat their homes. soon, america may be self sufficient in energy. also, if you're worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> fracking feels wrong. it feels like you're pumping stuff into mother earth. but it's an amazing story. >> a liberal european environmentalist points out that europe promised to cut its greenhouse gas i'm missiemissiot didn't cut them much. >> in europe we only managed to cut half when you guys accidentally stumbled to do in fracking. >> fracking is cheaper, plentiful. maybe better for the world. why are these people so mad? >> end fracking now! end fracking now! >> they worry about energy companies shoving these dangerous chemicals into the ground. >> this is a scene from an anti-fracking documentary called "gasland." >> for the documentary featuring "gasland," john fox. >> hollywood gave the director an emmy and matt damon's la
growing. we'll have a live update on "good morning america." >>> the search for a missing woman in oakland, california, has led police to a person of interest. they're combing through a fairgrounds after questioning a registered sex offender who dated sandra coke 22 years ago. he was spotted with her on sunday, the day she went missing. he has a long criminal history, that includes kidnapping and rape. and he was previously charged in two murders. >> we have not arrested this person in this case. but we are looking at this person as a person of interest. they have had history of dating. they are known to each other. >> coke is an investigator for the federal public defender's office. her family and friends have put up a $100,000 reward. >>> two college friends of suspected boston marathon bomber dzhokhar tsaranev, face charges for throwing away fireworks and other items they found in tsaranev's dormroom before capture. if crickonvicted, they will spe0 years in prison. >>> the atlantic hurricane season has been fairly quiet so far. but there may be busy months ahead. the forecast is calling
. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
, everybody, i'm martha maccallum here in "america's newsroom." what a story this is. gregg: incredible courage. i'm gregg jarrett in for bill hemmer. listen to the hero of this story. her name is antoinette toff. she came face-to-face with the shooting suspect, michael brand done hill. >> oh i'm in the front office. he went outside to start shooting. [gunfire] can i run? >> can you get somewhere safe? >> yeah. i got to go. and he's coming back. >> put the phone down. >> okay. she said she is getting police to tell him to back off for you, okay? >> tell them to stop all movement. >> okay. okay. >> stop all movement now on the ground. stop all movement on the ground. he said don't care if he die. he have nothing to live for. he says he is not mentally stable. >> stay on the line with me. okay? put the phone down if you have to but don't put it on hold so i can't hear. martha: she not only calms him down but then she speaks to the police and becomes a intermediary in this situation. she convinces him to give himself up before hurting anybody. listen to this part. >> let me talk to them an
, but john tyler's views were consistent. letitia was different. >> here is 1840 view of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control le
>> welcome to al jazeera america. here is a look at our headlines. the syrian government accused of chemical warfare on its own people, the the opposition group said the government killed hundreds of women and children. former egyptian president hosni mubarak may be released from house arrest within a few hours. and bradley manning sentenced to 35 years behind bars for leaking classified information. now his attorney wants help from the president. [♪ music ] >> we begin tonight with atrocities in syria and accusations of chemical warfare. it could put more pressure on president obama to get involved in the dispute. opposition groups are claiming that the government used chemical weapons in the overnight offensive. we want to warn you that some of the pictures we want to show you are extremely graphic. they show injured people being treated by hospital workers while others lie motionless. activists athey are victims of banned chemical weapons fired by government forces. and other video shows survivors struggling to breathe. al jazeera cannot verify the videos but if proved true
, they are trying to place in america in the important role of history. this is where they would have dinner. they would have a chance to meet one another, conversed socially and casually, and then they might be invited to dine in the dining room. after supper, the ladies would then adjourn back into the drawing room. maybe they would serve some coffee and tea. this was the social center of the house. if you were an invited guest of the madisons or part of the intimate circle of family or friends, you would be invited into the dining room from the drawing room. and here, dolly madison would in an unusual setting for the timeframe set at the head of the table and her husband, james, would sit at the center of the table. dolly would direct in, it -- with direct the conversation and james would be able to engage in intimate conversation with the people immediately to his right and left. this table today is that for eight people, but there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. that would not be unusual. and indeed, dolly madison considered dining at maag pier to be so much mor
>>> making news in america this morning -- breaking overnight, a new terror threat, forcing precautions overseas. americans being told to leave another country. >>> wild world. the rain keeps coming in parts of the country. triggering flash floods and the dramatic rescue of a newborn baby. >>> facebook shocker. a woman found dead. the suspect's facebook friends get a look at the crime scene plus a confession. >>> and a man turned a trash dumpster into a home. complete with bed, bathroom, and that's not all. >>> good friday morning. u.s. interests in pakistan are under threat this morning because of new terror fears. the state department is warning americans against travel there. >> they say there's a specific threat against the u.s. consulate in lahore, pakistan's second-largest city. abc's kristin fisher joining us on the latest details from overnight. >> reporter: diana, john, the key word is specific. this is a specific threat against the u.s. consulate in lahore, which is why only a handful of emergency personnel have been allowed to stay. all americans are now being urg
attended the u.s. army war college in pin in pennsylvania. there are security issues where the america needs cooperation. the security and the u.s. warships routinely transit an. each day in egypt fuel the call to cutoff aid. the detention of sti of spiritul leader brought this from the white house. >> that's not in line of the standard to uphold in respect to human rights. >> the relationship we skwreupt is deep. a decision to cutoff aid would carry wide reprocushions. al jazeera, washington. >> he's the associate professor of literature. welcome. >> thank you. >> give me your rea*bs to what you're seeing in egypt today and in washington. what if the united states cuts aid. what would that mean? >> i think united states should cut aid it seems to me that aid mostly to american. military cooperations for one thing. it also goes directly in to the military which is a guanator in egypt. that's been the case for a while. it seems to me that is increasingly of the society. >> the fact that egypt has been historically a strong allie of the united states what does that mean are regard to th
>>> making news in america this morning, tensions rise today. teams poised to probe a suspected chemical attack in syria as washington moves one step closer to military action. we are live with the latest. >>> growing concerns. a raging wildfire shows no signs of slowing down this california, and it could soon start affecting the water supply of an entire city. >>> hit-and-run on the racetrack. a driver takes out the pit crew costing him the race. who is really to blame? >>> the reunion, the performances and the outfits. we have the good, the bad and the ugly, the very ugly, on the mtv video music awards. ♪ >>> good morning, everyone. we begin with the mounting crisis in syria pushing the u.s. one step closer to military action. >> as the u.n. weapons inspections team today heads to the site of an apparent chemical weapons attack, last week the u.s. was considering its military options. abc's devin dwyer has the very, and he has latest from washington. >> reporter: good morning, diana and john. that's right, u.s. officials are in the midst of urgent consultations over syria. t
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural, political and education issues. he's the senior pfizer to project lead the way and on the advisory board of -- a chief education adviser to be in stock innovation. he is taught at boston university the university of texas at harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. it was the author of more than 24 books including to new york times number one bestsellers and the host of the old bennett's morning in america and has received more than 30 honorary degrees and as a final note a very long time ago bill and i were philosophy students together at williams college. bill will speak in a minute. he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of "is college worth it?." david is the associate producer of the nationally syndicated bill bennett's morning in america and a contributor to the manhattan institute's higher education policy blog and at claremont institute fellow and studied greek and latin at the catholic university in washi
, and will be replaced by al jazeera america. in our time here in "the war room" we have focused on important political stories from our march goes on series, to controlling the playing of gun violence in this country and the immigration reform debate that continues to rage on. joining me now inside "the war room" are two of my current colleagues and friends, john fugelsang, the host of "viewpoint, who has the second best hair on this network, and my very close friend, "the young turks" studio in los angeles cenk uygur. thank you both for joining us in "the war room" one last time. >> thank you, michael. >> thank you. >> michael: john, i'm sgoorth with you what do you think the impact that current tv has had on the progressive discussion if any at all? >> well, that's a good question. i have to say it was positive, if not necessarily profound. while this whole experience has proven that liberals are very good at capitalism, i'm very happy for mr. gore, i don't think network had the chance to make the proper impact it could have had had it had proper promotions behind it. i think if we would have had a
america - a new voice in american journalism - >>introduces america tonight. >>in egypt, police fired teargas at supporters of the ... >>a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. [[voiceover]] they risk never returning to the united states. >>grounded. >>real. >>unconventional. [[voiceover]] we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. >>an escape from the expected. >>i'm a cancer survivor. not only cancer, but brain cancer. that's the headlines "consider this" is up next on al jazeera. ♪ ♪ >>> measles outbreak in texas has been linked to a so-called mega church where ministers have questioned the use of vaccinations. at least 21 people from the illness. health officials and the church itself are trying to contain the outbreak by hosting vaccination clinics. doctors say a visitor to the church who was infected with measles likely spread it to the population at the community church. >>> it's a bit like having a snow day off, but across the midwest, it's heat not wintery weather that is closing schools. the sweltering temperatures have closed schools. those who
the news during good morning, america, or just tune into news channel 8 for more. >> all right, 6:06, your temperature 76 degrees. still ahead, adam giving us a sneak peek at the county fair. >> coming up, why you are forking over for bacon. >> there's going to be some change ahead of us today. >> in the form of rain, right, jackie? >> i think a better chance today than what we had yesterday. and quite a few of us got wet then. it is a warm start this morning. look at our temperatures. 76 in d.c. 66 is in frederic, and your temperature in culpepper is 73 degrees to start our day. there you can see the showers and thunder showers that moved through. things look good now. a few breaks in the clouds can be expected on and off throughout the day. we do have some fog issues. so we are down to about third of a mile visibility, use some caution for you are traveling in this area, or heading up that way, just under a mile visibility, you can see no problems here within the metro area. if you are traveling in the air today, there may be delays up and down the east coast, and that includes the big t
standards that are in little of informational texts. america is seeing two paths. choice or centralized education by the common core national standards. we have a choice to make. are we going to be a self- governing society or are a -- or society governed by despotism. a portion of one of the many education related events during c-span cost -- c-span's town hall program. we invite you to join the conversation. it starts tonight, 7:30 p.m. eastern time >> tonight on "first ladies." sofrances cleveland is popular. people are imitating her hairstyle. of her for piece themselves. we have always hurt as if we if we owned the first lady peered pictures of the first lady lady became extremely popular. you could purchase your own picture to have in your home. she is used in campaigns. we also have ms. cleveland running for first lady. >> the encore presentation of "first ladies" continues tonight at 9:00 eastern leading up to our live event at 11:00 this morning with the help secretary, we will hear about health care from vic morris, the former linton white house adviser. he speaks for about 25
, and the schools, no account teachers, and let's bring in teach for america clubs, open up charter schools in the district, and that's the model, the idea that's been propagated for the last decade plus under republican administration and a democratic administration. it is just the latest in a series of silver bullets overredded up, and you can just change the structure and everything else changes, but i think what union city teaches is -- or reminds us that -- is that there are a handful of time-tested, well-proven, well-established game changing strategies the school district can be done, and i'll say a word about that in a minute. why write about it? people forgot or took it for granted. it is almost like platitude, and any incompetenter with -- educator with a pulse will nod their head and say, sure. the trick is actually going from saying, yeah, that's a great idea to making it happen. in union city, you start with amazing preschool systems, and i know you are here someplace or another. where are you, suzie? [applause] i spent a fair amount of time in your class, and i walked in there
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
, the weekly standard, and the group concerned veterans for america. coming. you all for i am normally not intimidated at these events, but now that i realized who is here, now i am very worried. have all of you. i also want to thank you for your service, how pleased i am that peter king and john stossel have agreed to be here, judy miller and john bernstein as well. in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people in 2011. to trainvolunteered the afghan army. i remember him telling me at the time one of the key principles was to keep it simple. that is a key military principle. pete organized this event in the opposite way. two speakers, four panelists, john and i are co-moderators. luckily, the quality of the people overwhelm the complexity. we will have peter king speak for 10 minutes, john stossel speak for 10 minutes, and then we will have a panel. judy and gary will kick off, and a discussionhave it ihave of security. these are people who have thought seriously about this. i will give a brief introduction of pete king and john stossel and then get off the stage. peter king
angry, america. >>> good morning, america. i know some people that are really happy. here are the winning numbers in the lottery. get it out. 5, 25, 30, 58, 59 and the powerball, 32. >> oh. foiled by 32. >> just -- i was just going to say, that 32. >> we were close. line up because we've all gone winless. except for three. two of them coming actually in new jersey. here's one look at little egg harbor. it is in the sandy disaster zone. so, some real joy headed to a place that could use it. meanwhile, our linsey davis tracking the latest overnight from another winning location in the state of new jersey. that's where we find her. south brunswick, the place. linsey davis, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, josh. this is the super stop 'n shop. things opening up here. we were able to talk to one of the employees not too long ago inside. and he was telling us this isn't normally the place that has lottery frenzy. if you wanted to line up for a powerball ticket, there was no line at all. and while he has no idea who purchased that winning ticket, he's convinced som
is better for our friends and neighbors and ourselves than what they believe. >> and the america i live in disagreement is a way of life, that's how you get better solutions. you know, i don't want to be in an america where you cannot have dissent or disagreement. >> reporter: priebus warned the gop about being too combative at the expense of the conservative movement. >> if you just want to be angry, if you don't want to be a problem solver, you're putting yourself ahead of the movement, you're putting your personal ambition in front of your patriotic duty. >> reporter: what republicans seem most excited about, the digital campaign. there's a lot of work to do to catch up with democrats. but they'll roll out more this fall. >> thanks. >>> stocks finished on a down note. dow lost 31, s&p 500 fell 5, nasdaq dropped three for the week, dow lost 2.25%, worst week this year. s&p 500 dropped a little over 2%, nasdaq about a point and a half. >>> speaking of big money, the obama administration has bet and lost heavily on green energy. think solyndra. that has not stopped the white house from
the baseball game last night. we'll talk about what this means for america's pastime. plus, you may love that morning cup of coffee and then some. but how much is too much? that's just ahead. can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ at&♪ hooking up the countryess. whelping business run ♪ ♪ trains! they haul everything, safely and on time. ♪ tracks! they connect the factories built along the lines. and that means jobs, lots of people, making lots and lots of things. let's get your business rolling now, everybody sing. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪ ♪ helping this big count
that attracted the president to want to go? >> it was a world there. -- fair, it was a celebration of america's place in the new world. the presidency was very surprising in many ways. in fact, he was the president who took the country to the world stage. the spanish-american war and turned america into a republican into an empire. at the end of his life in the last speech he gave, in effect he talks in ways that years later we can all appreciate about opening america to the world. >> we were looking at our posting and everybody is asking about what is known of ida mckinley, her ill health. here she is traveling with the president. what did the country think of the president to know about her? >> it is an interesting dichotomy. this is the pattern of her life. she had been grossly miscast by history as this victorian invalid on the fainting couch. there were times when she was that way. she had chronic illnesses. one was seizure disorder, known as epilepsy. she had damage along her left leg which led to immobility. she also had a compromised immune system. she was susceptible to infections. t
plus seats in the air -- feet in the air. bonsai pipeline at six flags america. pass the high test. i did take one ride down. in order to get a video, cool vantage point for you viewers at home once i get to the bottom of this. so we start by opening the capsule and there's six capsules up here, all on this platform. and so they're able to handle quite a load of people. so i'm ready to step on up and if you don't mind taking the microphone from me when it's time to jump in. all right, let's do it, here we go, here's the noise. there we go. here. thank you. all right, get on in your capsule. trap door at my feet. i'm standing almost vertically right now. got to cross your arms. cross your feet. head back. back, a little bit back. i hate this part. i hate this part! whoo! whoo! [laughter] >> thank you, amy, for holding the microphone. that noise, the little clunk, clunk, and you wait, whoosh you get thrown down. honestly you don't realize what happened till your halfway down the slide, then it gets dark and that's when it whips you around the tube. different vantage point, i was wearing
is america's money. >> good morning, topping america's money, the price at the much just keeping on dropping. gas prices have slipped 7-cents in one week, now down to $3.56 a gallon. isle refineries have been keeping output high. will apple take a bite out of blackberry? potential buyers may be rival apple or google if only to get their hands on that technology. and facebook c.o.o. is getting her hands on a huge chunk of cash. she sold a 5% block of her facebook staff. said to be worth $400 million. and move other james patterson, james has knocked them off the highest paid list. even bypassing other literary giants like danielle steel and steven king that's america's money. >> "i'm terry mcauliffe, candidate for governor, and i sponsored this ad." it's been called "cuccinelli's witch hunt" "designed to intimidate and suppress" ken cuccinelli used taxpayer funds to investigate a uva professor whose research on climate chge cuccinelli opposed. cuccinelli, a climate change denier, forced the university to spend over half a million dollars defending itself against it's own attorney general. ken
.5 million this quarter. almost 50% of our business in north america is mobile. we're focused on migrating from being a daily deal e-mail business to being a true e-commerce marketplace where we now have over 54,000 deals live every day in north america. and we're focused on taking what's working in north america where we saw 23% growth in q1 accelerate to 30% in q2. and really give that to the rest of the world. we're by no means done. we've got a long way to go. >> now, you're alluding to the fact that though you have seen significant growth in the u.s., there is still significant weakness internationally. what's your plan to get the rest of the world on track? >> i mean, we saw some good improvement this quarter. europe shrank 8% year over year in q1. and that accelerated to 4% growth in q2. so that's pretty significant growth. we're now focused on taking the stuff that works. we know when we bring more deals to the market it has a huge effect. when we can get consumers to basically start with groupon when they want to buy anything anywhere, any time, we know that has a huge impact. and
between race and the criminal justice system. lawyer part of the moving america towards justice series. march onlso a special washington event. to haverivileged today a dynamic group of individuals who will guide our coverage around the complicated tough relationship between race and the criminal justice system. a briefrovide introduction for each panelist. they will then be allowed a short amount of time to present their area of expertise and focus and then we will open the floor after i have a series of brief questions to the panel. we will open the floor for your questions. i hope that you have gotten the cards and written your questions down. you will be holding them up so our people can collect them and bring them to me to read. before we get to the panel, it is a pleasure for me to introduce the president of the national bar association, patricia rosier. -- i just can't have her come up. she is the president of the national bar association, the nation's largest association of african american lawyers in justice. portionedicated a major of her life's work to the bar association. s
a political perspective, america does not want to touch the kind of mess in the middle east. theink that is just political context and reality of this. you asked whether any of us have regrets. regarding our support for democracy in the muslim brotherhood. let me be very clear. i know you know this. the three people sitting up here today have each been very clear eyed and very critical of what we saw as actions by the muslim brotherhood and president morsi that were undermining democratic prospects in egypt. president morsi issued a decree that set him above judicial review. he ran through a constitution that was asked visionary -- was exclusionary. were pushing ay law that would have eviscerated the judiciary. it would have clamped down public protests. civilld have nationalized society organizations in the country. i don't think any of us had any illusions about the trajectory that he was on and we all voice to those concerns. think, to no way i say that i am easily relaxed about the outcome in egypt. i think what happened on july 3 has sent a country further down the path toward
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
veterans of america, represents nearly 200,000 people, many of whom are young vets. msnbc contributor bill briggs joins me now with his report on this. bill, we've talked so much about the suicide rate and the problems, though, that these vets cite, sadly, are things that you would think could be addressed by our government, including getting their benefits when they retire and some other things that can be taken care of for them. >> yeah, the backlog on benefit -- receiving their benefits is enormous. that's contributing to this problem and has been for several years. it's such a complex issue, and it involves so many realities of coming home from war, reintegrating with your family, reintegrating with your community, finding a job, substance abuse. it's a very complex issue that i think some experts are finally starting to get a handle on maybe what's triggering this spike. >> and what do they believe is the key component? and i feel terrible trying to minimize this to one thing because as you pointed out, it's a laundry list of things these men and women face. >> yeah, what's really int
ring and if america is to be a great nation this must become true so let freedom ring let freedom ring. from the mighty mountain to new york let freedom ring from pennsylvania. not only that but let freedom ring from the resort. let freedom ring from the lookout mountain of tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery
was a really good friend. next. all throughout high school we hung out. >> heroin's increasing toll on america. and later...? >> in three more years, star trek is going to be celebrating its golden anniversary.,, [ female announcer ] new nature valley soft-baked oatmeal squares. hearty oatmeal now softly baked with a drizzle of cinnamon. it's a brand-new take on a morning classic. soft-baked oatmeal squares. new from nature valley. ♪ you have to let me know [ female announcer ] when sweet and salty come together, the taste is irresistible. sweet and salty nut bars by nature valley. nature at its most delicious. >> osgood: no parents want to believe their child could be hooked on heroin. so it's always a shocking discovery when they find out. it does happen every day and sometimes in places where you would least expect it. our colleagues at "48 hours" have spent the last few months investigating heroin addiction in a small town in illinois. our cover story is reported now by maureen maher. >> it's thursday afternoon in the levy chicago suburb of naperville, illinois. >> i will be home later.
for a dinner when they go on a date. this is why birth rate is too low in america. let me say, you can solve this problem, pay for dinner,and be a cheap skate because you can get two for one -- >> no wonder you're not married. >> any dead beat man who doesn't open a door for a woman and make her pay -- so much alimony to my husband, i'm never having dinner again. "cavuto on business" up next. >> did harry reid let his party's real health care plan out of the bag? good morning. it looks like democrats go along with with the bad private health care in america. that's not me saying it, although i have often said it. more on me later, my favorite subject. now back to the senate majority leader and what he was saying when asked about whether he was actually working to scrap our present health care basis. >> we are far from having something that will work. >> eventually, you think we'll work beyond -- >> yes. >>
listen america, nixon now ♪ nixon now, nixon now he's shown us how ♪ ♪ nixon now, nixon now, listen america, nixon now ♪ >> president nixon's victory in the election is surely one of the biggest land slides ever. let's look at the popular vote with almost all of it counted. 98% of the precincts reporting, nixon 45 million, mcgovern, 28 million. this adds up to a record breaking 520 electoral votes for president nixon, who won 49 states. mcgovern carried only massachusetts and the district of columbia for 17 electoral votes. >> at first, it was called the watergate caper. five men apparently caught in the act of burglarizing and bugging democratic headquarters in washington. but the episode grew steadily more sinister. no longer a caper, but the watergate affair escalating finally into charges of a high level campaign of political sabotage and espionage, apparently unparalleled in american history. the charges center around a man whose name means secrets. >> donald segretti. white house aides recruited him for secret intelligence fork and dirty tricks against the democrats. he went
to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. [ command center ] this is command center. [ man ] ...3, 2, 1. [ command center ] all systems go. [ female announcer ] introducing swiffer steamboost powered by bissell. steam-activated cleaning pads penetrate deep. [ command center ] we have lift off. [ female announcer ] don't just clean your floor. boost it. >>> live from america's news headquarters, i'm kelly wright. a massive wildfire triggering a state of emergency in san francisco. the flames are about 150 miles away in yosemite national park. but the city's utilities are in danger, as miles of power lines lay in the path of the fire. officials say san francisco has been forced to shut down two of the power stations so far. further disruption could have effect on the power su
on here at home this is a time to get off all foreign oil, especially foreign oil outside of north america. no reason to get off mexican and canadian oil. they're our friends. >> i feel like we've been saying this how many years now. >> beginning of time. >> fought with iraq, get off oil. gas hits $3, get off oil. we're not. nothing is happening. the problem, of course, is no one is making any more money than they were when gas was back at $3. so this is absolutely going to crunch the economy. especially your lower and middle-class people that don't have that much discretionary income to begin wit and now taking more of it. i fill my car up twice a week commuting and taking my kids point a to point b. this will hurt me. >> $4 oil is a killer. that's 40 to $50 dlb out of the economy. cost of goods sold goes up, cost of everything goes up and nothing good happens at that point in time. >> gary, i mean -- >> except for the fact that -- >> go ahead. >> increases new opportunities for people making alternative forms of fuel that are cost prohibitive for investment right now but when you have oi
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural political and educational issues. he's a senior at visor at project lead the way and on the advisory board of audacity.com and chief education advisor to -- he has taught at boston university university of texas and harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. that was the author of more than 24 books including two "new york times" number one bestsellers and a host of bill bennett's morning in america has received more than three honorary degrees bill and i were philosophy students together to bill will speak in a minute and he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of kathleen tighe. david is the associate producer of the ashley syndicated bill bennett's morning in america contributor to mining the campus a policy blog. in his honor i tried to come up with an opiate let end quote addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] we look forward to your pres
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 140 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)